Pain 101 - An Education in Pain Management
   

Pain Management Drugs Milwaukee WI

Pain Management is the process of providing medical care that alleviates or reduces chronic pain. Here you will find additional information on pain management, as well as local companies and providers that may help you in your search.

Aurora Pharmacy
(414) 258-3144
5928 W Vliet St
Milwaukee, WI
 
Osco Drug
(414) 442-9233
5929 W Lisbon Ave
Milwaukee, WI
 
Serv-U Pharmacy
(414) 445-9664
5300 W Burleigh St
Milwaukee, WI
 
Carter Drug Store
(414) 442-8760
2400 W Burleigh St
Milwaukee, WI
 
Osco Drug
(414) 771-9146
7520 W Bluemound Rd
Milwaukee, WI
 
Laabs Inc
(414) 342-0145
911 N 27th St
Milwaukee, WI
 
Aurora Pharmacy
(414) 219-7343
1218 W Kilbourn Ave
Milwaukee, WI
 
Walgreen Drug Stores
(262) 798-0140
21325 E Moreland Blvd
Milwaukee, WI
 
Walgreen Drug Stores
(414) 272-7770
1400 E Brady St
Milwaukee, WI
 
Osco Drug
(262) 827-0201
13995 W National Ave
Milwaukee, WI
 

Aspirin

(OTC NSAIDS)

Summary

NSAIDs are most effective for mild to moderate pain accompanied by swelling and inflammation. These drugs relieve pain by inhibiting an enzyme in your body called cyclooxygenase. This enzyme makes hormone-like substances called prostaglandins, which are involved in the development of pain and inflammation. NSAIDs are especially helpful for arthritis and pain resulting from muscle sprains, strains, back and neck injuries or cramps.

When taken as directed, NSAIDs are generally safe. But if more than the recommended dosage is taken — and sometimes even the recommended dosage — NSAIDs may cause nausea, stomach pain, stomach bleeding or ulcers. Large doses of NSAIDs can lead to kidney problems and fluid retention. Risk increases with age. If you regularly take NSAIDs, talk to your doctor so that he or she can monitor you for side effects.

NSAIDs have a so-called ceiling effect, or limit to how much pain they can control. This means that beyond a certain dosage, they don't provide additional benefit. If someone has moderate to severe pain, exceeding the dosage limit may not help relieve the pain.

Many NSAIDs require a prescription, but some lower-dose NSAIDs, such as aspirin and ibuprofen, are available over-the-counter.

Aspirin and other NSAIDs, for example, ibuprofen (e.g., Motrin, Advil) and naproxen (e.g., Aleve), are widely used to treat fever, pain, and inflammatory conditions such as arthritis, tendonitis, and bursitis. In addition to its effects on pain, fever, and inflammation, aspirin also has an important inhibitory effect on platelets in the blood. This antiplatelet effect is used to prevent blood clot formation inside arteries, particularly in individuals who have atherosclerosis of their arteries or are otherwise prone to develop blood clots in their arteries.

Of the 80 million aspirin tablets Americans take each day, most are taken not for everyday aches and pains but to reduce the risk of heart disease, according to aspirin manufacturer Bayer Corp.

As summarized in FDA's 1998 rule and in the updated professional labeling for aspirin, the 100-plus-year-old drug has been shown to reduce the risk of the following medical problems:

  • stroke in those who have had a previous stroke or who have had a warning sign called a transient ischemic attack (mini-stroke)

  • heart attack in those who have had a previous heart attack or experience angina (chest pain)

  • death or complications from a heart attack if the drug is taken at the first signs of a heart attack

  • recurrent blockage for those who have had heart bypass surgery or other procedures to clear blocked arteries, such as balloon angioplasty or carotid endarterectomy.

    Although aspirin is a familiar and readily available drug, people shouldn't take it for its cardiovascular benefits without discussing the risks of long-term use with a doctor, c...

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Ibuprofen

Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others)

(OTC NSAIDS)

Summary

NSAIDs are most effective for mild to moderate pain accompanied by swelling and inflammation. These drugs relieve pain by inhibiting an enzyme in your body called cyclooxygenase. This enzyme makes hormone-like substances called prostaglandins, which are involved in the development of pain and inflammation. NSAIDs are especially helpful for arthritis and pain resulting from muscle sprains, strains, back and neck injuries or cramps.

When taken as directed, NSAIDs are generally safe. But if more than the recommended dosage is taken — and sometimes even the recommended dosage — NSAIDs may cause nausea, stomach pain, stomach bleeding or ulcers. Large doses of NSAIDs can lead to kidney problems and fluid retention. Risk increases with age. If you regularly take NSAIDs, talk to your doctor so that he or she can monitor you for side effects.

NSAIDs have a so-called ceiling effect, or limit to how much pain they can control. This means that beyond a certain dosage, they don't provide additional benefit. If someone has moderate to severe pain, exceeding the dosage limit may not help relieve the pain.

Many NSAIDs require a prescription, but some lower-dose NSAIDs, such as aspirin and ibuprofen, are available over-the-counter.

These drugs are used for the management of mild to moderate pain, fever, and inflammation. Pain, fever, and inflammation are promoted by the release in the body of chemicals called prostaglandins. Ibuprofen blocks the enzyme that makes prostaglandins (cyclooxygenase), resulting in lower levels of prostaglandins. As a consequence, inflammation, pain and fever are reduced.

Ibu profen (Advil, Motrin, others)

Drugs such as Ibuprofen are used for the management of mild to moderate pain, fever, and inflammation. Pain, fever, and inflammation are promoted by the release in the body of chemicals called prostaglandins. Ibuprofen blocks the enzyme that makes prostaglandins (cyclooxygenase), resulting in lower levels of prostaglandins. As a consequence, inflammation, pain and fever are reduced.

Ibuprofen is used for the treatment of mild to moderate pain, inflammation and fever caused by many and diverse diseases. 

For minor aches, mild to moderate pain, menstrual cramps, and fever, the usual adult dose is 200 or 400 mg every 4 to 6 hours. Arthritis is treated with 300 to 800 mg 3 or 4 times daily.

The most common side effects from ibuprofen are rash, ringing in the ears, headaches, dizziness, drowsiness, abdominal pain, nausea, diarrhea, constipation and heartburn. NSAIDs reduce the ability of blood to clot and therefore increase bleeding after an injury. Ibuprofen may cause ulceration of the stomach or intestine, and the ulcers may bleed. Sometimes, ulceration can occur without abdominal pain, and black, tarry stools, weakness, and dizziness upon standing (orthostatic hypotension) d...

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Pain Medications

These may involve opioid drugs (analgesics) or other medications such as sumitriptan or DHE-45 (for migraines), tricyclic antidepressants, anticonvulsants, antihistamines, or phenothiazines. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used to treat mild to moderate pain. Many patients are being taken off drugs altogether, however. Pain clinics often begin by detoxifying patients and then starting a program of graded exercise.

Available Pain Therapeutics Drugs...

Anti-seizure medications

Some of the more effective and commonly used medications for chronic pain are drugs that were developed to control other conditions. Anti-seizure (anticonvulsant) medications were developed primarily to reduce or control epileptic seizures, but they also help control stabbing or shooting pain from nerve damage. These drugs seem to work by quieting damaged nerves to slow or prevent uncontrolled pain signals.

Anti-seizure medications used for chronic pain include:

  • ·        Carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol)

  • ·        Clonazepam (Klonopin)

  • ·        Divalproex sodium (Depakote)

  • ·        Gabapentin (Neurontin)

  • ·        Lamotrigine (Lamictal)

  • ·        Phenytoin (Dilantin)

  • ·        Oxcarbazepine (Trileptal)

  • ·        Tiagabine (Gabitril)

  • ·        Topiramate (Topamax)

  • ·        Valproic acid (Depakene)

These medications can cause dizziness, drowsiness, nausea and lack of balance and coordination. But most people are bothered only minimally. More severe but less common side effects include blood and liver disorders. To reduce your risk of side effects, your doctor will likely start you off on a small amount of the drug and gradually increase the dose while monitoring you.

Cox-2 inhibitors

COX-2 inhibitors are a type of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that specifically inhibits an enzyme known as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). These drugs are used to treat pain and may be less likely to cause gastrointestinal bleeding than other NSAIDs.

COX-2 inhibitors include:

  • ·        Celecoxib (Celebrex)

  • ·        Rofecoxib (Vioxx)

  • ·        Valdecoxib (Bextra)

Cyclooxygenase comes in two forms: COX-1 and COX-2. Unlike other NSAIDs, COX-2 inhibitors suppress only one form of cyclooxygenase, COX-2.

Researchers be...

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Note: Pain101.com does NOT provide medical advice or diagnoses.  You should always consult your

physician first, before beginning any pain management regimen or if you are suffering from a medical condition.

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